Farmer With a Cape

thehappysorceress:

Superman by Karina Lorenzetti


andthatsterrible:

What that fuck are either Superman or Lex Luthor going to do with a balding guy in a bad suit? Superman does not need anybody to fight for him.

andthatsterrible:

What that fuck are either Superman or Lex Luthor going to do with a balding guy in a bad suit? Superman does not need anybody to fight for him.


$3,207,852.00 for Action Comics but the last bid was only beaten by $100. There’s no telling how high it could have gotten if time was added to the counter for each bid.

superhero-auction:

Superman by Andrew Bosley
Part of a Superhero-themed Charity Auction in memory of Jules Jammal. All proceeds will go toward funding annual scholarships for the SJSU Animation/Illustration program where Jules was a beloved student and teacher.
» See more & bid online. Ends Sep 6, 2014.Like this? Please reblog and share!

superhero-auction:

Superman by Andrew Bosley

Part of a Superhero-themed Charity Auction in memory of Jules Jammal. All proceeds will go toward funding annual scholarships for the SJSU Animation/Illustration program where Jules was a beloved student and teacher.

» See more & bid online. Ends Sep 6, 2014.
Like this? Please reblog and share!


boomerstarkiller67:

"The Strange Lives of Superman!" - art by Curt Swan (1961)


supermantights:

which is your favorite company, marvel or batman?

supermantights:

which is your favorite company, marvel or batman?


herochan:

Bizarro
Created by Adnan Ali

herochan:

Bizarro

Created by Adnan Ali


zuerst:

looking through some junk files-
old Bizarro redesign
Bizarro really should have been the Manjin Buu of the DC Universe. 

zuerst:

looking through some junk files-

old Bizarro redesign

Bizarro really should have been the Manjin Buu of the DC Universe. 


cleanlined:

The Mechanical Monsters!  Starring Superman!!
(My homage to the classic Max Fleischer cartoon)

Amazing!

cleanlined:

The Mechanical Monsters!  Starring Superman!!

(My homage to the classic Max Fleischer cartoon)

Amazing!


ashwinpande:

Eulogy’s written for Superman by celebrities written in the special “NEWSTIME” issue published by DC Comics in 1993. Published during the “Funeral For A Friend” storyline.


fuckyeahbehindthescenes:

According to Roger Moore’s autobiography he witnessed Christopher Reeve walking through the canteen at Pinewood Studios in full Superman costume oblivious to the swooning female admirers he left in his wake. When he did the same thing dressed as Clark Kent no one paid any attention.
Superman (1978)

fuckyeahbehindthescenes:

According to Roger Moore’s autobiography he witnessed Christopher Reeve walking through the canteen at Pinewood Studios in full Superman costume oblivious to the swooning female admirers he left in his wake. When he did the same thing dressed as Clark Kent no one paid any attention.

Superman (1978)


bunkerhillbros:

"Supergirl" from Marcio Takara.
Deez@Deezer509

bunkerhillbros:

"Supergirl" from Marcio Takara.

Deez
@Deezer509


thecomicsvault:

SUPERMAN by Carey Bates (1976)

thecomicsvault:

SUPERMAN by Carey Bates (1976)


thecomicsvault:

ACTION COMICS #335 (March 1966)Art by Al Plastino Words by Leo Dorfman

thecomicsvault:

ACTION COMICS #335 (March 1966)
Art by Al Plastino 
Words by Leo Dorfman


gallerynextnow:

Drew Friedman’s portrait of Siegel & Shuster in the mid-seventies when Siegel was working as a file clerk
and Shuster was unemployed
and near-blind, created for his new book Heroes of the Comics

On July 22, the Graphic Artists Guild joined the National Writers Union (NWU), the  Science Fiction Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) in signing on to an amicus brief on behalf of the heirs of the creators of  “Superman,” Siegel and Shuster, and Jack Kirby, an early Marvel Comics artist. The brief supports the rights of both families to sue DC Comics and its parent company, Warner Brothers, and Marvel, respectively, to recover the original copyrights to the work of Siegel and Shuster, and of Kirby. The families of Siegel and Shuster, and of Kirby, are seeking to have the US Supreme Court hear their appeals of two Circuit Court decisions which rejected their attempts to regain the copyrights.  
Siegel and Shuster, the co-creators of the Superman series, originally signed away their rights to the character in 1938. Their heirs unsuccessfully sought to terminate DC Comic’s copyrights to the work by issuing statutory notices of termination in 1997 and 2002. In 2013, the Ninth Circuit Court stripped Shuster’s heirs of termination rights, a ruling that according to NWU ignores the Supreme Court’s opinion in the landmark case NY Times v Tasini (2001), which ruled that termination rights are inalienable. Kirby’s heirs sought to terminate Marvel’s copyrights to his artwork, a move which Marvel countered in 2010 by suing the Kirby family for declaratory relief that Kirby’s work fell under the work for hire exception to the Copyright Act. The judge hearing the case ruled in favor of Marvel, and the ruling was affirmed by the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in 2013.
While the Supreme Court has not yet stated that the petition will be reviewed, indications are good. Marvel initially refused to respond to the petition, but was asked by the justices on May 14 to file a response. The petition has been distributed to the justices for conference on September 29. A ruling by the Supreme Court in favor of the heirs to Siegel, Shuster, and Kirby would have wide implications on the interpretation of the copyrights of independent contractors and creators.

http://drewfriedman.blogspot.com

gallerynextnow:

Drew Friedman’s portrait of Siegel & Shuster in the mid-seventies when Siegel was working as a file clerk and Shuster was unemployed and near-blind, created for his new book Heroes of the Comics

On July 22, the Graphic Artists Guild joined the National Writers Union (NWU), the Science Fiction Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) in signing on to an amicus brief on behalf of the heirs of the creators of “Superman,” Siegel and Shuster, and Jack Kirby, an early Marvel Comics artist. The brief supports the rights of both families to sue DC Comics and its parent company, Warner Brothers, and Marvel, respectively, to recover the original copyrights to the work of Siegel and Shuster, and of Kirby. The families of Siegel and Shuster, and of Kirby, are seeking to have the US Supreme Court hear their appeals of two Circuit Court decisions which rejected their attempts to regain the copyrights.

Siegel and Shuster, the co-creators of the Superman series, originally signed away their rights to the character in 1938. Their heirs unsuccessfully sought to terminate DC Comic’s copyrights to the work by issuing statutory notices of termination in 1997 and 2002. In 2013, the Ninth Circuit Court stripped Shuster’s heirs of termination rights, a ruling that according to NWU ignores the Supreme Court’s opinion in the landmark case NY Times v Tasini (2001), which ruled that termination rights are inalienable. Kirby’s heirs sought to terminate Marvel’s copyrights to his artwork, a move which Marvel countered in 2010 by suing the Kirby family for declaratory relief that Kirby’s work fell under the work for hire exception to the Copyright Act. The judge hearing the case ruled in favor of Marvel, and the ruling was affirmed by the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in 2013.

While the Supreme Court has not yet stated that the petition will be reviewed, indications are good. Marvel initially refused to respond to the petition, but was asked by the justices on May 14 to file a response. The petition has been distributed to the justices for conference on September 29. A ruling by the Supreme Court in favor of the heirs to Siegel, Shuster, and Kirby would have wide implications on the interpretation of the copyrights of independent contractors and creators.

http://drewfriedman.blogspot.com


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